Football Safety Facts & Information:

In Pop Warner Football, there is “an absence of catastrophic head and neck injuries and disruptive joint injuries found at higher levels.”

The injury rate in Pop Warner Football is:

Less than one-third the injury rate in high school football (AND) less than one-fifth the injury rate in college football (AND) less than one-ninth the injury rate in professional football.

Furthermore, Pop Warner's age-weight schematic protects younger, lighter players, who do not have higher injury rates.

The Institute of Sports Medicine and Athletic Trauma in New York completed a Pop Warner injury survey in 71 towns covering over 5,000 players in 1998. The injury experience of 5,128 boys (8 to 15 years of age, weight 22.5 to 67.5 kg [50 to 150 lb]) participating in youth football revealed an overall rate of significant injury of 5%, with 61% classified as moderate and 38.9% as major injuries. That's about 1.33 per team per year. No catastrophic injuries occurred, and it was rare for a permanent disability to result from any injury.

Pop Warner Rule Change on Concussions:

2012 Pop Warner Safety Rule Change: Pop Warner Little Scholars Inc. 2012 In Season Safety Rule Amendment Re: Concussions.

Per the Pop Warner Little Scholars Official Rules 2010 Part II, Introduction to the Rules, S3 “NO RULES WILL BE ADDED AFTER AUGUST 1ST UNLESS IT IS A SAFETY ISSUE”, the following rule shall be immediately effective for the 2010 season: Part III, POP WARNER REGULATIONS – ALL PROGRAMS, ARTICLE 17: IMPORTANT POINT MEDICAL (page 23). Click Here for the New Rule

Injury Prevention & Control: Concussions:

A concussion is a type of traumatic brain injury, or TBI, caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head that can change the way your brain normally works. Concussions can also occur from a fall or a blow to the body that causes the head and brain to move quickly back and forth.

Health care professionals may describe a concussion as a “mild” brain injury because concussions are usually not life-threatening. Even so, their effects can be serious.

Click Here to Visit the CDC Page on Concussions | Download the Fact Sheet

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